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COVID-19 VACCINES & WHAT TO KNOW

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2/15/2021

Hi Everyone, 

I wanted to update you all that I have completed my 2nd dose of the Moderna COVID-19 Vaccine on February 10th, 2021. I only experienced a sore arm  for two days, along with some tiredness. I have spoken to others that have said they have experienced fever, hot and cold flashes, and headaches, but those symptoms were gone within 36 hours. 

I wanted to share this update with you because I want you all to know that I have the best interests of all of you in mind. I wanted to share this experience to explain what I experienced. Me sharing this with you I hope will encourage you to try to an appointment to get vaccinated. I am so happy I did go through with it. I am still practicing all the safety protocols, but now, I feel a bit of weight lifted off my shoulders. 

Please visit the following websites to try to schedule an appointment. I know there are limited spots, but remember, you are in Phase 1A so you will have access right now if you find an appointment.

https://www.jewelosco.com/pharmacy/covid-19.html

https://coronavirus.illinois.gov/s/vaccination-location

If you are still having questions, please click the COVID-19 Vaccine FAQ links below from the Mayo Clinic and Rush University to educate yourself. These FAQ pages answer many questions you may be asking. Vaccine production, safety, and much more. Educate yourselves. Come to a decision based on trusted sources.

Mayo Clinic COVID-19 Vaccine FAQ Page

Rush University COVID-19 Vaccine FAQ Page

 

I encourage all of you that can receive the COVID-19 Vaccination to get it, but please educate yourself before any decision is made. I am a true believer that the more you know the more you empower yourself to make the right decision for you.

Thank you for your time and thank you all for what you do. You are all my true heroes!

Sincerely,

Travis Slaby

Owner

ARIS at home

February 1, 2021 - ARTICLE FROM THE NY TIMES

 

Good morning. The vaccine news continues to be better than many people realize.

By David Leonhardt

 

Infections aren’t what matters

 

The news about the vaccines continues to be excellent — and the public discussion of it continues to be more negative than the facts warrant.

Here’s the key fact: All five vaccines with public results have eliminated Covid-19 deaths. They have also drastically reduced hospitalizations. “They’re all good trial results,” Caitlin Rivers, an epidemiologist at Johns Hopkins University, told me. “It’s great news.”

Many people are instead focusing on relatively minor differences among the vaccine results and wrongly assuming that those differences mean that some vaccines won’t prevent serious illnesses. It’s still too early to be sure, because a few of the vaccine makers have released only a small amount of data. But the available data is very encouraging — including about the vaccines’ effect on the virus’s variants.

“The vaccines are poised to deliver what people so desperately want: an end, however protracted, to this pandemic,” as Julia Marcus of Harvard Medical School recently wrote in The Atlantic.

Why is the public understanding more negative than it should be? Much of the confusion revolves around the meaning of the word “effective.”

What do we care about?

 

In the official language of research science, a vaccine is typically considered effective only if it prevents people from coming down with any degree of illness. With a disease that’s always or usually horrible, like ebola or rabies, that definition is also the most meaningful one.

But it’s not the most meaningful definition for most coronavirus infections.

Whether you realize it or not, you have almost certainly had a coronavirus. Coronaviruses have been circulating for decades if not centuries, and they’re often mild. The common cold can be a coronavirus. The world isn’t going to eliminate coronaviruses — or this particular one, known as SARS-CoV-2 — anytime soon.

Yet we don’t need to eliminate it for life to return to normal. We instead need to downgrade it from a deadly pandemic to a normal virus. Once that happens, adults can go back to work, and children back to school. Grandparents can nuzzle their grandchildren, and you can meet your friends at a restaurant.

 

As Dr. Ashish Jha, the dean of the Brown University School of Public Health, told me this weekend: “I don’t actually care about infections. I care about hospitalizations and deaths and long-term complications.”

The data

 

By those measures, all five of the vaccines — from Pfizer, Moderna, AstraZeneca, Novavax and Johnson & Johnson — look extremely good. Of the roughly 75,000 people who have received one of the five in a research trial, not a single person has died from Covid, and only a few people appear to have been hospitalized. None have remained hospitalized 28 days after receiving a shot.

To put that in perspective, it helps to think about what Covid has done so far to a representative group of 75,000 American adults: It has killed roughly 150 of them and sent several hundred more to the hospital. The vaccines reduce those numbers to zero and nearly zero, based on the research trials.

Zero isn’t even the most relevant benchmark. A typical U.S. flu season kills between five and 15 out of every 75,000 adults and hospitalizes more than 100 of them.

I assume you would agree that any vaccine that transforms Covid into something much milder than a typical flu deserves to be called effective. But that is not the scientific definition. When you read that the Johnson & Johnson vaccine was 66 percent effective or that the Novavax vaccine was 89 percent effective, those numbers are referring to the prevention of all illness. They count mild symptoms as a failure.

“In terms of the severe outcomes, which is what we really care about, the news is fantastic,” Dr. Aaron Richterman, an infectious-disease specialist at the University of Pennsylvania, said.

The variants

 

What about the highly contagious new virus variants that have emerged in Britain, Brazil and South Africa? The South African variant does appear to make the vaccines less effective at eliminating infections.

Fortunately, there is no evidence yet that it increases deaths among vaccinated people. Two of the five vaccines — from Johnson & Johnson and Novavax — have reported some results from South Africa, and none of the people there who received a vaccine died of Covid. “People are still not getting serious illness. They’re still not dying,” Dr. Rebecca Wurtz of the University of Minnesota School of Public Health told me.

The most likely reason, epidemiologists say, is that the vaccines still provide considerable protection against the variant, albeit not quite as much as against the original version. Some protection appears to be enough to turn this coronavirus into a fairly normal disease in the vast majority of cases.

“This variant is clearly making it a little tougher to get the most vigorous response that you would want to have,” Dr. Francis Collins, director of the National Institutes of Health, said. “But still, for severe disease, it’s looking really good.”

What would an expert do?

 

The biggest caveat is the possibility that future data will be less heartening. Johnson & Johnson and Novavax, for example, have issued press releases about their data, but no independent group has yet released an analysis. It will also be important to see much more data about how the vaccines interact with the variants.

But don’t confuse uncertainty with bad news. The available vaccine evidence is nearly as positive as it could conceivably be. And our overly negative interpretation of it is causing real problems.

Some people worry that schools cannot reopen even after teachers are vaccinated. Others are left with the mistaken impression that only the two vaccines with the highest official effectiveness rates — from Moderna and Pfizer — are worth getting.

In truth, so long as the data holds up, any of the five vaccines can save your life.

Last week, Dr. William Schaffner of Vanderbilt University told my colleague Denise Grady about a conversation he had with other experts. During it, they imagined that a close relative had to choose between getting the Johnson & Johnson vaccine now or waiting three weeks to get the Moderna or Pfizer vaccine. “All of us said, ‘Get the one tomorrow,’” Schaffner said. “The virus is bad. You’re risking three more weeks of exposure as opposed to getting protection tomorrow.”

Hi Everyone!

I just wanted to give you a follow up to how I am feeling two weeks after I received my 1st dose of the Moderna COVID-19 Vaccine. I have been symptom free since that first 24 hours I mentioned in my first letter. I feel really good and am eager for February 10th to arrive. That is when I am scheduled for my 2nd Dose. 

Like I said in my previous letter, I am informing you all of my personal experience in order to give you more information to make a truly personal decision. I encourage you all to get vaccinated, but also educate yourselves fully in order to feel confident. Read my first letter below again and reference the information links I gave out.

I also want to share with you an article I read in USA Today today that describes some national statistics regarding the first 22 million recipients of the vaccine. Read it here

Finally, If you are ready to receive the COVID-19 Vaccine, I received an updated website link to the Jewel-Osco scheduling site. Please click on the link below to find the closest Jewel-Osco to you and try to schedule an appointment. Doses are still limited, so bookmark this link and check back often for open appointments if you are not able to schedule right away.

https://www.jewelosco.com/pharmacy/covid-19.html?deeplinkuid=afe1dc57-fde4-4ea1-8462-3f4c2b66e839&cmpid=em_jwo_jwo_cb__ahoc__20210127&Theme=COVID19_Prep_CVIS

I wish you all good health and safety and Thank You For What You Do!

Sincerely,

Travis Slaby

Owner

ARIS at home

1/21/2021

Hi Everyone, 

I wanted to share with you that I have completed my first dose of the Moderna COVID-19 Vaccine on January 13th, 2021. After receiving the 1st dose of vaccine, I experienced a sore arm where I got the shot and some slight fatigue. I am scheduled to receive my 2nd dose of the Moderna COVID-19 Vaccine on February 10th, 2021.

I am sharing this with you because I want you to know that before I decided to get vaccinated for COVID-19, I had many questions. I knew I wanted this nightmare to end, but was the vaccine safe for myself, for my family? Was the vaccine hurried to production and were corners cut? I knew I would not get concrete "Yes" or "No" answers to these questions, but wanted to educate myself as much as possible in order to feel confident in the science that created these vaccines that can save many lives and end this pandemic.

So I turned to two trusted sources I have turned to many times in my career. I sought out information from The Mayo Clinic and Rush University. Over my 20 years in the healthcare industry, I have turned to their information on health and healthcare frequently. I respect and trust their research and information they put out to the world.

If you are having the same questions I had, or have other questions regarding the COVID-19 Vaccines, please click the COVID-19 Vaccine FAQ links below from the Mayo Clinic and Rush University to educate yourself. These FAQ pages answer many questions you may be asking. Vaccine production, safety, and much more. Educate yourselves. Come to a decision based on trusted sources.

Mayo Clinic COVID-19 Vaccine FAQ Page

Rush University COVID-19 Vaccine FAQ Page

 

I felt confident in these sources of information to make the decision to receive the vaccine, and I am happy I did.

 

I encourage all of you that can receive the COVID-19 Vaccination to get it, but please educate yourself before any decision is made. I am a true believer that the more you know the more you empower yourself to make the right decision for you.

I will update this letter to let you know how the 2nd dose went once I receive it.

 

Thank you for your time and thank you all for what you do. You are all my true heroes!

Sincerely,

Travis Slaby

Owner

ARIS at home

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